How and Why Millennials and Generation Z are Driving Trends in the Work Place

How and Why Millennials and Generation Z are Driving Trends in the Work Place

It is now widely noted that over the last 10 -15 years, there have been some clear trends developing in more forward-thinking work places that have been driven by the needs and skills of the Millennials and now by Generation Z.& So how are things changing in offices and why are such trends emerging?

How are things changing?

  • There has been a massive increase and acceptance of the use and worth of technology including using social media in the workplace.
  • Companies have begun to overtly promote their work culture and beliefs as part of their brand.
  • Employers are increasingly allowing flexible working – giving employees the freedom to clock on and clock off when they want – as long as the job gets done.
  • The hierarchy at work is less rigid and secretive and there has been a move towards greater transparency, so everyone is informed of company plans and so that there are opportunities for anyone to lead a project if they want to.
  • Office style has become more casual and more creative; employees tend to dress more casually and in furniture is often moved around to create ad hoc meeting spaces.& Pods tend to be fewer and you are more likely to have open plan offices.
  • Some companies are beginning to offer employees work perks such as free breakfast, lunch and dinner, free membership at gyms and even nap pods!

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Why are things changing?

  • Employees know that they have to listen to what millennials want because by 2020 this generation will make up 50% of the global workforce and although the generation is more numerous than any since the Baby Boom generations, millennials are still in short supply in parts of the world where there has been a low birth rate.

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  • Millennials are “digital natives” – they’ve grown up with Smart phones, laptops and social media.& They quickly embrace new technology and tools to improve and simplify what they do at work and if less digitally fluent bosses try to prevent this, tension grows. Most older employers now realise that they need to embrace the Millennials’ knowledge and learn from it.&

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  • Millennials and Generation Z have grown up in a culture where schools have taught them that when everyone participates, everyone is a winner and increasingly liberal parents have given them more choices at home – &therefore, they are not afraid of failure and they have the confidence to believe they have the right to have a say or in the decisions their company makes or that anyone in the company is capable of leading a project if they have the desire to do it. Indeed, employers are also noticing a decidedly entrepreneurial streak with their new, very young recruits (Generation Z). &

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  • Millennials are used to having instant access to information – so they want their bosses to freely share information about company plans and direction.

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  • This generation entered the workforce in the midst of the Great Recession, so many well qualified graduates were unemployed or compromised their career path to get work.& Many have had little job security and have had to change jobs several times so they tend to lack trust in employers and will look out for number one.& Research has shown that they expect to change jobs frequently in order to get what they want from work and so, as the financial climate improves, &employers will need to work harder to retain them by offering work perks.

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  • The APD Research Institute has revealed that what motivates Millennials the most is quick career progression, then flexibility and then cash incentives, hence why smart bosses are doing away with rigid hierarchy.

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  • APD Research has also shown that Millennials want to know and believe in the purpose of what they are doing and tend to want employers with the same values as them, hence why companies have started including their values as part of their brand.& Popular values might be: flexible working, collaboration and keeping a healthy work-life balance.

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  • The oldest of the Millennials or (Generation Y) are now in their mid-thirties themselves.& As employers, they tend to expect total enthusiasm, total collaboration and effort.& They don’t care what you wear to work or what hours you keep, as long as you’re 100% productive and get the job done on time and this approach is driving change even more.

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What Generation X and Baby boomer bosses have started to realise is that Millennials and Generation Z are not at all selfish or technologically dumbed-down as some people have suggested.& These generations are the product of improvements in our schools and improved parenting – Millennials are confident, brave and they believe in fairness, transparency and collaboration. The future looks bright with these kind of leaders, so employers are adapting work places to meet their needs.&

Here at Clarendon, with our fully equipped modern and stylish offices, we can help you create the flexible and creative workspace that fully embrace the trends led by&Millennials and Generation Z.&

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